Videos

Small-scale Gold Mining: Chinese Operations in Cameroon

  • Untertitel: Small-scale Gold Mining: Chinese Operations in Cameroon
  • Sprecher: Ein Film von Katja Becker und Jonathan Happ
  • Ort: Cameroon
  • Datum: Oktober 2016
  • Beschreibung: 

    Ein Film von Katja Becker und Jonathan Happ (2016) in Zusammenarbeit mit dem vom BMBF-geförderten Forschungsprojekt AFRASO –"Afrika's Asiatische Optionen" (http://www.afraso.org)

    Over the last decade, Cameroon’s artisanal and small-scale mining sector has gone through several mutations thanks to the new policy which has attracted various international investors from Asia, Africa, Europe, and America. As from 2012 on, the involvement of Chinese entrepreneurs has dramatically accelerated the pace of progress in the sector. Some of them switched from other economic activities they were already pursuing in the country whilst the others, mostly mining professionals, moved from the Ghanaian gold mining business to Cameroon.
    Chinese entrepreneurs have gradually become main players in the gold mining operations, recording successes, while other actors, e.g. Koreans, went bankrupt and in many cases have sold their business capital to Chinese without any competition.
    Through taking over those projects coupled with their greenfield mining initiatives, Chinese investors has gained the image of successful businessmen in the sector. As a result, their working style and techniques are gradually being adopted by almost all local and foreign investors. This is the context that spurred AFRASO researcher Diderot NGUEPJOUO together with the filmmaking crew UJUZI travel to Cameroon and shoot the 3rd AFRASO documentary. The film follows several active players in the major segments of the Artisanal and Small-scale Mining (ASM) in Cameroon: a Chinese investor; local entrepreneurs (member of Parliament, businessman, and middleman); workers, small operators in “Nguéré”, civil servants as well as the affected communities on their working sites.
    The film reveals that political elite and administrative authorities appear to favour the involvement of Chinese operators because they consider it beneficial to the State and local entrepreneurs (service providers, middlemen…), while traditional rulers and business people who did not partner with Chinese are less supportive of this presence.
    Furthermore, the positive impacts resulting from gold mining are reported to be enjoyed by Chinese investors and some local entrepreneurs while the communities are left with the impact of these activities such as land disturbance, water pollution, diseases... All in all, the movie tries to put forward the ongoing dynamics and contradictions that are taking place in the Cameroon's gold mining.

Malaysia for me is ... - African students in Asia

  • Untertitel: Malaysia for me is ... - African students in Asia
  • Sprecher: Ein Film von Melanie Gärtner
  • Ort: Südostasien
  • Datum: April 2016
  • Beschreibung: 

    Malysia for me is...

    Ein Film von Melanie Gärtner (2016) in Zusammenarbeit mit dem vom BMBF-geförderten Forschungsprojekt AFRASO –"Afrika's asiatische Optionen" (http://www.afraso.org)

    2014 stellte die malaysische Einwanderungsbehörde über 27.000 Visa für afrikanische Studierende aus – und damit 25.000 Visa mehr als noch im Jahr 2006. Der Film „Malaysia for me is ...“ thematisiert den „Boom“ der Anzahl afrikanischer Studierender in Malaysia. Vier Protagonisten aus vier verschiedenen Ländern Afrikas erzählen was sie nach Malaysia führte, was sie sich von dem Studium versprechen und vor welche Herausforderungen sie das Leben in einer anderen Kultur stellt. Der Film bietet einen Einblick in ihren Alltag und in ihre – positiven wie negativen - Erfahrungen mit Malaysia.

    Malaysia becomes an emerging supplier of higher education, aiming to turn into a global education hub with 10% of tertiary students coming from abroad by 2020. Having already established itself as a large supplier of higher education in South-East Asia and China, Malaysia has recently started to look out for new regions, which could serve as lucrative student providers. Africa with its rapid economic development, high population growth and the resulting increase of demand for quality higher education has become one of the new target regions for the Malaysian student recruitment.
    In 2014, the Malaysian immigration office issued more than 27,000 student visas for African nationals, which are 25,000 visas more than in 2006. The documentary „Malaysia for me is...” explores the recent “boom” in the number of African students in Malaysia. The filmmaker Melanie Gärtner and Alexandra Samokhvalova, a researcher in the project “Africa’s Asian Options” – AFRASO – at Goethe University Frankfurt accompany the four protagonists to get a glimpse into their daily lives. The four students, who come from different African countries (Namibia, Tanzania, Guinea and Chad), talk about their experiences of studying and living in multi-ethnic and multi-cultural Malaysia. Having different backgrounds, they offer diverse perspectives on the “phenomenon” of recent increase in the number of African students in the country. They also share their personal reasons – the so called “push & pull factors”, which helped them to decide in favor of Malaysia as their study destination. Kaiho and Jenny, students from Namibia and Tanzania, mention affordable tuition fees and relatively low living costs; while Youssouf from Chad stresses the importance of welcoming policies of the government and an international image of Malaysia as a forward-looking and peaceful Islamic nation as important reasons for him to choose Malaysia. The students also talk about their future plans and opportunities back home, which a Malaysian degree could bring. Besides, the film touches upon the issue of discrimination and negative image of African students in Malaysia, which the protagonists describe as one of the main challenges of staying in the country. Thus Moustafa, a student of Guinean origin, who has lived in Malaysia his whole life, explains how he fits into the local society and tries to play the role of a “stereotype breaker” in attempt to change the attitude towards Africans in the country. Despite stories about discrimination and other challenges of living in Malaysia, the students leave the impression of being satisfied with their living conditions and the quality of higher education. Moustafa even calls Malaysia his second home. Even though opinions about future growth of African students’ population in Malaysia differ among the protagonists, the film manages to show that Africans play a big role in the internationalization of higher education in Malaysia and will most likely continue to come in search for better chances in life at low cost.
    “Malaysia for me is…” is a documentary film by Melanie Gärtner, which was produced in cooperation with Alexandra Samokhvalova, a researcher at the Frankfurt Inter-Center-Programme on new Asian-African interactions AFRASO (Africa’s Asian Options). With the support of the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF), AFRASO carries out research on various topics of African-Asian interactions, including migration of African students to Malaysia.

Just Another Chinese Guy

  • Untertitel: Just Another Chinese Guy
  • Sprecher: Ein Film von Melanie Gärtner
  • Ort: Südafrika
  • Datum: März 2015
  • Beschreibung: 

    Just Another Chinese Guy
    A documentary by Melanie Gärtner, 2015 (16min)in cooperation with the BMBF-funded project AFRASO (Africas Asian Options)(http://www.afraso.org).

    While media coverage on Chinese-African interactions commonly portrays them as a neocolonial political project; a look on the daily lives of Chinese people in Africa, who are trading, settling and forming communities, reveals that mono-causal explanations for the presence of Chinese people in Africa are misleading. Transnational migration is usually economically motivated, but Chinese people migrate to Africa for different personal reasons and come from various regions and social classes.
    The South African city of Johannesburg is a centre of China’s presence in Africa. Over the last twenty years, Chinese migrants have set up shopping malls in Johannesburg, where they sell Chinese consumer products to the local population and traders from South Africa and neighboring countries. In consequence, a Chinatown has been established in one of Johannesburg’s suburbs, where one can find greengrocers who sell goods that are grown on “Chinese” farms in South Africa as well as hairdressers and computer shops that are almost exclusively for Chinese. Chinese newspapers, clubs and associations also have their offices there.
    In “Just Another Chinese Guy”, the documentary filmmaker Melanie Gärtner accompanies Angus, a young Chinese, through Chinese Johannesburg. Angus recounts from his own life and the life of his friends. The audience is even introduced to Angus’ exceptional hobby: Playing bagpipes. With a focus on Angus’ narrations, the film presents a complex and emerging community. For Angus and his friends, Africa is not only symbolized by famines and poverty, but also represents a continent of opportunities that became their home. Angus’ friend Conny, for example, lives in Johannesburg since four years and has already established her own business. Angus admires her business model and Conny’s personality. For his friend Scot, Johannesburg is a chance to overcome the restrictions of Chinese society and to pursue playing bagpipes. For Andy, migration did not turn out very well and he would prefer to return to China as soon as possible. “Just Another Chinese Guy” depicts Angus’ role as a mediator between his friends, his family and the South African society, but also tells how Angus tries to set up his own way of life that differs from that of his parents and older siblings. The portrayal of Angus’ friends indicates that migration is experienced differently from person to person and shows that migration cannot exclusively be thought in categories like integration and assimilation. Angus, for example, perceives himself as South African. He is not a stranger in the South African society, but part of it.
    “Just Another Chinese Guy” is based on the cooperation between the documentary filmmaker Melanie Gärtner and Matthias Gruber, an anthropologist at Goethe University, Frankfurt. The film has been made within the research project Africa’s Asian Options (AFRASO) that is funded by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF). Within AFRASO, researchers from Goethe University approach African-Asian interactions from transregional and comparative perspectives. Trading networks between Africa and Asia are one thematic focus of the overall project, which Matthias addresses from the perspective of Chinese traders in Johannesburg. Accordingly, trade is perceived as more than the exchange of goods and service. It also covers questions of mobility, migration and the development of communities.

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